Home > Blogs > Concrete Block / ICF House Plans: A Vintage Style Is on the Rise Again

Concrete Block / ICF House Plans: A Vintage Style Is on the Rise Again

Practicality and Appealing Architectural Styles Merge in Concrete Homes

 

 

I grew up in an area of the world where as many as 20 tropical storms can hit the country in a year. I still remember the torrential downpours, the frightening winds, and the flooded streets. But within our home – located on the second floor of a concrete building ­­– all of us always felt safe. While some houses were battered by the rain and winds, with roofs and windows flying, we were sheltered in our “fortress” – warm, comfortable, and mostly unthreatened by the elements.

 

Perhaps memories of the durability of that home spurred my brother to build a concrete block house in the Mediterranean style – surrounded by native trees and shrubbery. During one particular nasty storm, some of the trees fell to the ground – without inflicting any damage to the house – which withstood the gale winds and heavy rains.

 

While the house remained intact, an outdoor kitchen made mostly of wood and other materials was completely destroyed. It was fortunate that when disaster struck no one was in the kitchen or anywhere near its vicinity. When all the debris was cleared and order restored to the ruined area, my brother built a new concrete block kitchen in place of the old one. 

 

 

A one-story, four-bedroom Mediterranean-style house plan – with concrete block exterior walls – is perfect for coastal living or areas where tropical storms are prevalent (Plan #107-1144).

 

 

Advantages of the Concrete Block / ICF Home

 

 

You don’t have to live in an area affected by typhoons and tornadoes to consider a concrete block or ICF (insulated concrete form) designed house plan. Wherever you are, these styles offer several advantages.

 

Concrete block designs use CMUs (concrete masonry units) as the primary material for construction. These units are made from high-strength concrete mixtures that make them durable and resistant to demanding weather conditions. Masonry is also a preferred finish for many architects and builders.

 

The concrete block design is popular in places with warm climates like Florida and other southern states. Because the CMUs slow down the transfer of heat due to their thermal mass, the homes tend to stay cooler curing the day in the hot summer weather. In addition to their energy-efficiency, concrete block homes are also fire resistant and long lasting.  

 

 

A rendering of a two-story, three-bedroom modern home showcases the concrete exterior walls. Built on a small lot, the home comes with covered front and rear porches, a sundeck, home theater, and Great Room perfect for gatherings (Plan #116-1016).

 

 

ICF homes, which have been increasingly on the rise since the 1990s, use insulating foam forms that are filled with concrete and sometimes steel reinforcement to form airtight, well-insulated walls. These structures are strong and durable, as well as pest and fire resistant, and tone down street and other noise from the outside.

 

All of these qualities make homes built from ICF house plans attractive to contractors, builders, and potential homeowners.   

 

 

You can turn this rendering of a delightful ICF home plan into reality. The one-story, four-bedroom home with country touches has an appealing brick façade and features lots of space for a bonus room and a basement. (Plan # 132-1257)

 

 

You’ll find ICF-designed homes in almost every state. If you live in the Midwest or in the Northeast with all the snow and cold weather, ICF house plans can reduce or totally eliminate cold drafts. In Florida, the Gulf Coast and other states that experience severe storms and hurricanes, ICF homes are ideal because they are wind-resistant. And, of course, on the West Coast, they offer protection from earthquakes and fires.  

 

Here are the overall benefits of concrete block / ICF-designed homes:

 

1.  Energy-efficiency, resulting in cost savings on bills

2.  Durability

3.  Protection from high winds, harsh weather conditions, and other forces of nature

4.  Safety, quiet, and comfort

5.  Insect resistance

 

With all of these advantages, it’s no surprise that concrete block / ICF designed home plans are back in the architectural picture. 

 

 

The Many Faces of Concrete Block / ICF Homes

 

 

From ancient Greece and Rome – and masterpieces of concrete construction like aqueducts and the dome of the Pantheon – the technique of using concrete to build homes came to the U.S. on a large scale in the 1800s.

 

Architectural experts note that the first home in the U.S. to be built entirely of concrete was on Staten Island, NY, in 1837. But it wasn’t until the early to the mid-1900s that concrete structures – offices and homes – started lining the U.S. landscape.   

 

While concrete block / ICF designed homes are practical and durable, it doesn’t mean that they are boring and unattractive. On the contrary, they are quite versatile.

 

A majority of the first concrete block homes were built in the Midwest through the 1920s, including some historic homes designed by Frank Lloyd Wright. You can work closely with your architect and builder to design and use exterior finishing materials to make your concrete home look like just about any architectural style.

 

 

One of Frank Lloyd Wright’s sensational Usonian designs, this three-bedroom concrete home in Cincinnati’s Amberley Village was built by his grandson Eric and sits on four acres of land.  

 

 

Here’s a view of the magnificent open-floor-plan layout (a signature feature of Frank Lloyd Wright-designed homes). The living/dining/kitchen areas merge seamlessly into one gorgeous Great Room.  

 

 

Mediterranean/Spanish Style

 

 

If you love the red-tiled roofs, arches, and columns of the Mediterranean style, you have so many choices at your fingertips – from the unassuming to waterfront manors, to the luxurious, and castle-like. 

 

 

Don’t be fooled by the “no-frills” look of this one-story, three-bedroom Mediterranean-style home, with the sturdy concrete exterior wall structure. Open the door and walk into a spacious open floor plans design featuring a Great Room, den, home office, covered lanai, and a covered rear porch  (Plan #133-1029).

 

 

A beautiful Mediterranean-style waterfront manor – perfect for coastal areas – comes with five bedrooms, four-and-half baths, the signature red tile roof, arched windows and balcony. The exterior walls and driveway are concrete  (Plan # 107-1029).

 

 

Imagine yourself in this magical castle-like luxury Mediterranean home – again built using concrete exterior walls – going from balcony to balcony to bask in nature’s beauty. The three-story, seven-bedroom residence features a formal entrance with galleries on both sides  (Plan #107-1035).

 

 

Beachfront/Coastal  

 

 

The sound of the ocean waves may be music to your ears – but when high winds and hurricanes approach, there’s nothing safer than a concrete block / ICF house as a Beachfront or Coastal home. 

 

 

A one-story, four-bedroom coastal style plan of concrete block exterior construction is a picture of calm and tranquility. Tall columns anchor the covered porch which opens into the dining and living rooms (Plan #107-1187).

 

 

Traditional House Plans

 

 

The classic and simple Traditional house plan has been called “America’s style.” It’s one of the most common styles built from coast to coast. These homes are often single-level structures with hip roofs and covered porches. 

 

 

A great-looking one-story Traditional home with attractive concrete exterior walls and covered porch comes with three bedrooms, two full baths, and a one-car garage (Plan #107-1204).

 

 

Modern House Plan

 

 

For the Modern house plan in your future, think clean lines, open living spaces, environmentally friendliness, and a mostly uncluttered look. 

 

 

 

A two-story, three-bedroom concrete / ICF house plan has all the amenities of modern living: a theater, kitchen with an eating bar, outdoor living space with a waterfall pool, private outdoor garden, and rooftop observation deck (Plan #116-1015).

 

 

Isn’t it time for a new perspective on concrete homes? Throw away the misconceptions, and begin to see their versatility and attractive features.

 

 

Footnote: The lead (top) image in this article is a two-story, four-bedroom concrete block / ICF house plan with Southern and Contemporary touches. For more on the home, view: (Plan #175-1064)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Concrete Block / ICF House Plans

Concrete Block / ICF Floor Plans

Concrete Block / ICF Home Plans

VIEWS 3359
1 2 3 4 5+
0 1 2 3+
Min
Max
Min
Max
Min
Max
advanced
Get exclusive offers, tips and updates
SIGN UP