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What’s so fascinating about a colonial style house? With its roots in the 1700s, the “Colonial” exudes the warmth, charm and tradition of early American life. Perhaps the most popular and timeless architectural style in the country, the “Colonial” is the result of the imagination and culture of various European settlers. So, symbolically, it is a depiction of the once-and-future-diversity of America. The Georgian-style Oliver Wolcott home in Litchfield, CT (1754) is still around. Wolcott served as Governor of Connecticut from 1796 to 1797. www.historicbuildingsct.com/?p=10 The river side of Mount Vernon (facing the Potomac River) showcases its famous porch and colonnade. www.mountvernon.org/mansion/10facts The Georgian-style Oliver Wolcott home in Litchfield, CT (1754) is still around. Wolcott served as Governor of Connecticut from 1796 to 1797. www.historicbuildingsct.com/?p=10 The river side of Mount Vernon (facing the Potomac River) showcases its famous porch and colonnade. www.mountvernon.org/mansion/10facts The Georgian-style Oliver Wolcott home in Litchfield, CT (1754) is still around. Wolcott served as Governor of Connecticut from 1796 to 1797. www.historicbuildingsct.com/?p=10 The river side of Mount Vernon (facing the Potomac River) showcases its famous porch and colonnade. www.mountvernon.org/mansion/10facts The Georgian-style Oliver Wolcott home in Litchfield, CT (1754) is still around. Wolcott served as Governor of Connecticut from 1796 to 1797. www.historicbuildingsct.com/?p=10 The river side of Mount Vernon (facing the Potomac River) showcases its famous porch and colonnade. www.mountvernon.org/mansion/10facts The Georgian-style Oliver Wolcott home in Litchfield, CT (1754) is still around. Wolcott served as Governor of Connecticut from 1796 to 1797. www.historicbuildingsct.com/?p=10 The river side of Mount Vernon (facing the Potomac River) showcases its famous porch and colonnade. www.mountvernon.org/mansion/10facts The Georgian-style Oliver Wolcott home in Litchfield, CT (1754) is still around. Wolcott served as Governor of Connecticut from 1796 to 1797. www.historicbuildingsct.com/?p=10 The river side of Mount Vernon (facing the Potomac River) showcases its famous porch and colonnade. www.mountvernon.org/mansion/10facts The Georgian-style Oliver Wolcott home in Litchfield, CT (1754) is still around. Wolcott served as Governor of Connecticut from 1796 to 1797. www.historicbuildingsct.com/?p=10 The river side of Mount Vernon (facing the Potomac River) showcases its famous porch and colonnade. www.mountvernon.org/mansion/10facts The Georgian-style Oliver Wolcott home in Litchfield, CT (1754) is still around. Wolcott served as Governor of Connecticut from 1796 to 1797. www.historicbuildingsct.com/?p=10 The river side of Mount Vernon (facing the Potomac River) showcases its famous porch and colonnade. www.mountvernon.org/mansion/10facts Over time, designs/plans of Wren, Indigo Jones and other notable English architects became evident in the homes built in the new country. As the boundaries between North and South were set, two distinct architectural styles emerged in New England and Virginia. New England colonials were basically simple two-story wood frames with an open floor plan design. They had pitched roofs and a chimney on the exterior. A fireplace was key for the cold winters. The Southern colonials were large and sometimes majestic two-to-three story brick homes. Inside were high ceilings to allow more airflow during the summer months. The exteriors featured distinct porticoes and colonnades extending across the front of the homes. George Washington’s Mount Vernon is the classic Southern Colonial home. Over time, designs/plans of Wren, Indigo Jones and other notable English architects became evident in the homes built in the new country. As the boundaries between North and South were set, two distinct architectural styles emerged in New England and Virginia. New England colonials were basically simple two-story wood frames with an open floor plan design. They had pitched roofs and a chimney on the exterior. A fireplace was key for the cold winters. The Southern colonials were large and sometimes majestic two-to-three story brick homes. Inside were high ceilings to allow more airflow during the summer months. The exteriors featured distinct porticoes and colonnades extending across the front of the homes. George Washington’s Mount Vernon is the classic Southern Colonial home. Over time, designs/plans of Wren, Indigo Jones and other notable English architects became evident in the homes built in the new country. As the boundaries between North and South were set, two distinct architectural styles emerged in New England and Virginia. New England colonials were basically simple two-story wood frames with an open floor plan design. They had pitched roofs and a chimney on the exterior. A fireplace was key for the cold winters. The Southern colonials were large and sometimes majestic two-to-three story brick homes. Inside were high ceilings to allow more airflow during the summer months. The exteriors featured distinct porticoes and colonnades extending across the front of the homes. George Washington’s Mount Vernon is the classic Southern Colonial home. Over time, designs/plans of Wren, Indigo Jones and other notable English architects became evident in the homes built in the new country. As the boundaries between North and South were set, two distinct architectural styles emerged in New England and Virginia. New England colonials were basically simple two-story wood frames with an open floor plan design. They had pitched roofs and a chimney on the exterior. A fireplace was key for the cold winters. The Southern colonials were large and sometimes majestic two-to-three story brick homes. Inside were high ceilings to allow more airflow during the summer months. The exteriors featured distinct porticoes and colonnades extending across the front of the homes. George Washington’s Mount Vernon is the classic Southern Colonial home. Over time, designs/plans of Wren, Indigo Jones and other notable English architects became evident in the homes built in the new country. As the boundaries between North and South were set, two distinct architectural styles emerged in New England and Virginia. New England colonials were basically simple two-story wood frames with an open floor plan design. They had pitched roofs and a chimney on the exterior. A fireplace was key for the cold winters. The Southern colonials were large and sometimes majestic two-to-three story brick homes. Inside were high ceilings to allow more airflow during the summer months. The exteriors featured distinct porticoes and colonnades extending across the front of the homes. George Washington’s Mount Vernon is the classic Southern Colonial home. Over time, designs/plans of Wren, Indigo Jones and other notable English architects became evident in the homes built in the new country. As the boundaries between North and South were set, two distinct architectural styles emerged in New England and Virginia. New England colonials were basically simple two-story wood frames with an open floor plan design. They had pitched roofs and a chimney on the exterior. A fireplace was key for the cold winters. The Southern colonials were large and sometimes majestic two-to-three story brick homes. Inside were high ceilings to allow more airflow during the summer months. The exteriors featured distinct porticoes and colonnades extending across the front of the homes. George Washington’s Mount Vernon is the classic Southern Colonial home. Over time, designs/plans of Wren, Indigo Jones and other notable English architects became evident in the homes built in the new country. As the boundaries between North and South were set, two distinct architectural styles emerged in New England and Virginia. New England colonials were basically simple two-story wood frames with an open floor plan design. They had pitched roofs and a chimney on the exterior. A fireplace was key for the cold winters. The Southern colonials were large and sometimes majestic two-to-three story brick homes. Inside were high ceilings to allow more airflow during the summer months. The exteriors featured distinct porticoes and colonnades extending across the front of the homes. George Washington’s Mount Vernon is the classic Southern Colonial home. Over time, designs/plans of Wren, Indigo Jones and other notable English architects became evident in the homes built in the new country. As the boundaries between North and South were set, two distinct architectural styles emerged in New England and Virginia. New England colonials were basically simple two-story wood frames with an open floor plan design. They had pitched roofs and a chimney on the exterior. A fireplace was key for the cold winters. The Southern colonials were large and sometimes majestic two-to-three story brick homes. Inside were high ceilings to allow more airflow during the summer months. The exteriors featured distinct porticoes and colonnades extending across the front of the homes. George Washington’s Mount Vernon is the classic Southern Colonial home. Over time, designs/plans of Wren, Indigo Jones and other notable English architects became evident in the homes built in the new country. As the boundaries between North and South were set, two distinct architectural styles emerged in New England and Virginia. New England colonials were basically simple two-story wood frames with an open floor plan design. They had pitched roofs and a chimney on the exterior. A fireplace was key for the cold winters. The Southern colonials were large and sometimes majestic two-to-three story brick homes. Inside were high ceilings to allow more airflow during the summer months. The exteriors featured distinct porticoes and colonnades extending across the front of the homes. George Washington’s Mount Vernon is the classic Southern Colonial home.

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